Time to say goodbye

Hello readers,

It’s been far too long since I wrote anything meaningful on this blog, so I have decided that this will be my last post. I have really enjoyed researching and writing on here but I now blog on other websites and find little time to contribute to this one. If anyone is looking for more climate or Earth-science blogs then I would thoroughly recommend the European Geosciences Union blogging network. I have written the GeoPolicy column there for a little over a year now. The blog network is full of information about climate, geoscience, and the scientists working in these fields.

Thank you for reading and thanks for your comments.

Sarah

Is there a place for the humanities in climate change policy?

Something I wrote for the Centre for Science and Policy’s annual conference write up – where I am currently interning.

Centre for Science and Policy

Written by Sarah Connors, CSaP Policy Intern.

Last week’s CSaP annual conference featured a discussion on the multiple dimensions of climate change with a particular focus on the incorporation of the humanities. This session, chaired by Professor James Wilsdon, a lecturer in science policy at the University of Sussex welcomed three speakers from backgrounds in both academia and the private sector.

To listen to a recording of this session, click here: //sms.cam.ac.uk/media/1957893/embed

“Issues of equality, justice and fairness arise with respect to mitigation” – IPCC

Arthur Petersen, Professor of Science, Technology and Public Policy, kicked off the talks by discussing his experiences with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He observed the processes as a Philosophical Observer for the Dutch Government. Intergovernmental processes require the collaboration, negotiation and compromise of representatives across all work fields. Professor Petersen stated that although the IPCC has little input on…

View original post 298 more words

Flying in the land of the midnight sun

A team of Atmospheric Scientists have been using the British research plane BA-146 to take airborne measurements of Methane in the Arctic. Have a read below..

Arctic Methane

This week in Kiruna, Sweden was my first field trip and first time north of the Arctic Circle. This time of the year there is 24 hour daylight, a stark contrast to the vision I had of Santa Claus’ home – who knew that in Lapland you have to pack sunscreen! It all makes sense if you think about the reason for the field trip, the wetlands, and how as the temperature gets warmer methane is released.

On Monday afternoon I had my first flight, and not only was the science experience great but the view was spectacular!

Wetlands out of the window of my first science flight (Photo: Ines Heimann) Wetlands out of the window of my first science flight (Photo: Ines Heimann)

We flew two different low East-West legs from Kiruna over the Finnish wetlands (most likely the more brownish areas, see photo). What I did not expect was such a bumpy ride: even with very low winds, 500 ft above…

View original post 379 more words